Most of the time, your website is the first point of contact for a prospect.
It needs to represent you well.

Studies show that approximately 70% users claim that they determine whether a company is trustworthy on the on the based on the looks on their website. I know I do.

On average, it only takes someone a few seconds to determine whether they want to stay or leave your website—which can be the difference between a sale you’ve been waiting for, or the loss of a customer.

Part of that decision is made on whether or not they find your website to be trustworthy.

It takes about 50 milliseconds for users to form an opinion about your website that determines whether they like your site or not, whether they’ll stay or leave.

So let me ask you, does your website build trust?

You might be thinking, so what does it take to build trust with your website? Here are 7 points to follow:

1. Strong Web Design

Is your web design strong? Remember when websites were first introduced? They were ugly. In fact, it’s our definition of a “spammy look” now. If yours still looks like that, you won’t be converting anyone into sales.

2. Current Information

Is your site up-to-date? Is your information about services or projects from 2014? It’s likely that you need to make some updates to the content on your website.

3. Mobile Friendly

Does it look good on a smart phone? Nearly 70% of all website traffic now is mobile. Users aren’t going to pinch and scroll around on their smartphone anymore. They’re going to leave your site and go find a competitor of yours.

4. Authentic Photos

Don’t use super generic or cheesy stock photos – unless that’s part of your design. But even then, it better look good. Real photos are best. But if you have to use stock photos, use ones that help tell your story. And for God’s Sakes, Buy Them! If I see a watermark on a photo, I’ll burn my computer down. I swear.

5. Clear Sight of Services or Products

Are your services up-front and center? Is it easy for the user to determine what you do or what you’re selling? If not, put them up top and don’t be afraid to repeat it. Don’t make the user have to hunt for what it is that you’re selling.

6. Contact Information

Is your contact information easily accessible? Is it listed in multiple places? It should at least be in the header or footer. Or both!

7. Copyright Date

The copyright date in your footer. Is it showing the current year? Does yours still say 2013? Pfft, you might be out of business as far as the user knows. I know it might sound a little silly, but that’s the first thing I check for on a website. Mainly one that doesn’t have a blog or articles.

 

If you follow all those points, you’ll be on the right track to winning users/prospects over and turning them into customers.

Does all that make sense? Either way, holler at me if you have any questions. I’m here to help!

Holler At Me

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